Wednesday, April 16, 2008

What is the difference between Abstract Factory and Builder design patterns?

The two design patterns are fundamentally different. However, when you learn them for the first time, you will see a confusing similarity. So that it will make harder for you to understand them. But if you continue to study eventually, you will get afraid of design patterns too. It is like infant phobia, once you get afraid at your early age, it stays with you forever. So the result would be that you never look back at design patterns again. Let me see whether I can solve this brain teaser for you.

In the image below, you have both design pattern listed in. I am trying to compare the two one on one to identify the similarities. If you observe the figure carefully, you will see an easily understandable color pattern (same color is used to mark the classes that are of similar kind).



Please follow up with the numbers in the image when reading the listing below.

Mark #1: Both patterns have used a generic class as the entry-class. The only difference is the name of the class. One pattern has named it as “Client”, while the other named it as “Director”.
Mark #2: Here again the difference is the class name. It is “AbstractFactory” for one and “Builder” for the other. Additionally both classes are of type abstract.
Mark #3: Once again both patterns have defined two generic (WindowsFactory & ConcreteBuilder) classes. They both have created by inheriting their respective abstract class.
Mark #4: Finally, both seem to produce some kind of a generic output.

Now, where are we? Aren’t they looking almost identical? So then why are we having two different patterns here?

Let’s compare the two again side by side for one last time, but this time, focusing on the differences.

Abstract Factory: Emphasizes a family of product objects (either simple or complex)
Builder: Focuses on constructing a complex object step by step
Abstract Factory: Focus on *what* is made
Builder: Focus on *how* it is made
Abstract Factory: Focus on defining many different types of *factories* to build many *products*, and it is not a one builder for just one product
Builder: Focus on building a one complex but one single *product*
Abstract Factory: Defers the choice of what concrete type of object to make until run time
Builder: Hide the logic/ operation of how to compile that complex object
Abstract Factory: *Every* method call creates and returns different objects
Builder: Only the *last* method call returns the object, while other calls partially build the object
Sometimes creational patterns are complementary: So you can join one or many patterns when you design your system. As an example builder can use one of the other patterns to implement which components get built or in another case Abstract Factory, Builder, and Prototype can use Singleton in their implementations. So the conclusion would be that the two design patterns exist to resolve two type of business problems, so even though they look similar, they are not.

I hope that this shed some light to resolve the puzzle. If you still don’t understand it, then this time it is not you, it has to be me and it is since that I don’t know how to explain it.

1 comment:

erani said...

Thanks a lot! This was very useful in trying to figure out the difference.

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